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Northern cave
Northern cave
Comments: 5
Alexandr

23.11.2017, 23:52








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Gallery Design
Gallery Design

            

Gallery Design
Description: Hello, everybody! I haven't updated my website in about 5 months. Finally I buckled up to do some work and along with the regular renders-update, I re-designed my old gallery interface and came up with the one you see here.

Apart from its native flash-made shell (if you happen to visit it), the image is a mix of Apophysis and Photoshop. I'm still on the 2D practical side, gentlemen. I hope you like it!
Added by: richter
Keywords: gallery, design, richter, web, site, apophysis, core
Date: 06.21.2009 20:08
Hits: 3982
Downloads: 118
Rating: 0.00 (0 Vote(s))
File size: 547.1 KB
Previous image: Fighter



Author: Comment:
Alexandr
Member

Join Date: 07.31.2008
Comments: 328
-

Hey, very nice, Richter! Made in your own unique stile! Little scary and solemn, yet beautiful!
06.21.2009 20:16 Offline Alexandr sashama at mail.ru
bullit35744
Member

Join Date: 10.22.2008
Comments: 394
-

Real nice job!!
06.22.2009 15:30 Offline bullit35744 https://sites.google.com/site/bullit35744
Horo
Admin

Join Date: 05.26.2004
Comments: 4399
-

You have a real artist's web site and this gallery main page is as beautiful as the rest.
06.22.2009 15:39 Offline Horo h.-r.h.wernli at bluewin.ch https://www.horo.ch/
richter
Member

Join Date: 04.15.2004
Comments: 1097
-

Thanks, gentlemen! I try to do my best.
06.23.2009 16:37 Offline richter richter at cold-may.com
rashadcarter1
Admin

Join Date: 06.04.2006
Comments: 2615
-

Always professional, always insightful, master Richter. Looks great to me but then I am biased for I have yet to dislike a single thing you have ever made. Whenever I want to feel humbled I take a quick look at your gallery and your website!

I must say too I really appreciate the time you take to include the step by step processes you use for your magnificent scenes. This is a labour of love and respect for your fellow artists and it is most noteworhty. Too often skilled craftsmen hide their secrets, but you are generous enough to share! Thanks!!!!!
06.27.2009 19:43 Offline rashadcarter1 rashadcarter1 at aol.com
richter
Member

Join Date: 04.15.2004
Comments: 1097
-

Thank you very much, Rashad!
Although I really don't feel like such a master, I'm an artist just like you and the rest here, but I appreciate your kind words, I always did.

One small question - your last two-three sentences - is that another way of saying that right here I need to put more info describing what I've done? In this "Unrelated genre" section, especially for 2D work, I didn't see much of an interest in "how" something is made or "what" , "why" and "where" it is positioned within the photoshop layer work. Nobody ever asked about a specific postwork techniques. That is why I'm so quick with the description lately. Of course, I can always explain and it will be a pleasure to share my craftsman "secrets" :) as long as someone wants to know. Rashad, if I misunderstood your words, ignore what I just wrote :)

In any case... in order not to miss anything, I'll just review things one-by-one and get back to you with enough info in separate comment.
06.30.2009 08:14 Offline richter richter at cold-may.com
richter
Member

Join Date: 04.15.2004
Comments: 1097
Walkthrough:

So, here's the little walkthorough for this gallery-design image:

1. Since I wanted it to look similar to an old pirate map with the all the fonts, stains and torn edges, the main fundament - the background - consist of a burn-stained paper - [see this Img], which later was color- and layer option-corrected to appear as even older and darker paper - [see this Img] . The "correction" was done in three steps (see this layer arrangement [Here]:

a) 1st step is fairly simple, I just increased the contast and the exposure of the burned paper to [look Like This], named this layer "ExposureCorr"

b) 2nd step - I took the old background form my web's "Archive" section - [see this Img] - and copied it as a new layer over the "ExposureCorr" and in its blending options switched to Color Dodge with layer opacity of 41%. Here I'm setting the opacity to full 100% so you can see what kind of change made the 2nd step to the overall composition so far - [see this Img], with the opacity set to 41% the actual image was supposed to look like [This], named this layer "oldArchive"

c) 3rd step - as you can see from the previous one, the result I had was too bright so I needed something to make it darker but without messing the other layer's brightness and/or exposure - the solution was to take another paper texture. I have a collection of special japanese paper textures and [I used This One] to bring up more harsh look to the "pirate map" mix. You'll notice that this one also has some rusty color that would have changed my composition once I add it on top. Remember I just needed to make the Burned Paper darker, no color shifts anywhere whatsoever. So I simply desaturated the japanese texture, placed it on top the "oldArchive" layer and further tweaked the opacity from 100% to 37%. The power of the "darkening" effect was additionally enchanced by the Linear Burn blending option this current layer has, named it "MonochrEdit". A really nice bonus I get from the 3rd step is that along with the "darkening"-effect freedom I have (due to tweaking the opacity), I also inherit the japanese texture pattern.

So the first main step with the three sub-steps [gave me This Result overall]


2. Here I took all I had from the main (1.) step, flattened it (Layer->Flatten Image).

Note: When working with the blending options (Multiply, Linear Burn, Color Dodge, etc.) once you combine all your layers by selecting them and pressing Ctrl+E, most of the time the effect of the blending options is lost and/or unpredictably acting, resulting in composition change. That is why I preffer to use the Flatten Image option, which helps keeping all the work done so far intact.

a) This flattened layer I took to a new document (the old source file is still open with the flattening change UNDONE, and saved). In the new source document I recopied two times the layer and then with hard-edged brushes [like These Ones]. I erased the edges of the "pirate" paper sheet to look like it was torn off some book, the result was [the coresponding Image], the second copy of the "pirate" paper was soft-erased [in This Fashion]

b) With the erasing done, I copied the two differently erased layers in our previous document on top the "MonochrEdit" layer. The hard-erased one I named "CZoneGreen Shade" and the soft-erased one "backGR". For the "CZoneGreen Shade" I added a dark-green Drop Shadow from its Blending Options, so [Finally it looked Like This].

c) For the current modified and ready layers "CZoneGreen Shade" and "backGR" the flattening-and-new-document operation was repeated. After that, all I had to do was to take combined Apophysis renders I had prepared before for the upper and lower frame of my gallery design as follows - [Upper] and [Lower]. A given separate layer is highlighted in Red. A fragment of the lower frame exactly as it was rendered is [Shown Here].

Note: I've been saying this since I got into texturing with apophysis renders but... It won't hurt to mention this here too: It's hell-of-a-lot easier to work with such renders once they've been exported as *.png file format. It supports 32 bit imagery, which simply means another 8 bits of "color"-less information in your image file - Transparency. This way you combine, layer on top, below, can use as masks and a ton more options for all your apophysis renders... unlimited more or less.

An example of almost pure Apophysis + Photoshop work is this [Uranium] image I did awhile ago.

Few more tweaks were made to bring this Gallery Design into flash to become web-interactive interface, but that's another thing and workflow to explain which isn't related to this walkthrough.

The walkthorough really is Not so complicated it may sound at first when seeing all the written info.

To draw a general conclusion, the whole process consist of:
1. Taking a texture; 2. Reworking it (erasing, color-changes/balance); 3. Placing the ready texture where you think is best for your composition; 4. Tweaking the layer options (such as Multiply, Color Dodge, Luminocity, etc.) and the Blending options (Drop Shadow, Outer/ Inner Glow, etc.). So that's it! I hope you enjoy this walkthrough. If someone has any specific questions - never hesitate to ask! Such techniques can serve not only as 2D photomanipulation workflow, but also as improving a given texture for your upcomming 3D models and projects. Good luck and thank you for reading!
07.02.2009 11:21 Offline richter richter at cold-may.com
rashadcarter1
Admin

Join Date: 06.04.2006
Comments: 2615
Wow!

2 things. First, I was referring in general terms to the way your website features the "making of" processes that are extremely useful. I was not suggesting indirectly that the same was required here.

But thanks for writing this up anyhow because I learned some things from reading it. It must have taken some time to write up. Mega thanks!
07.05.2009 16:30 Offline rashadcarter1 rashadcarter1 at aol.com
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